Philip Levitt, M.D. - Company Message
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A New Hope for Reducing Medical Errors

A study published last December in the Journal of the American Medical Association is a small bud on a nearly barren tree. That is because little progress has  been made in reducing deadly medical errors since the surprisingly high incidence of such problems was disclosed by the Institute of Medicine in 1999. The institute had recommended an approach, called systems, used chiefly in the airline and automobile manufacturing industries. but little was achieved in the fourteen years that followed despite a widespread effort to systematize American healthcare. Estimates of the annual mortality vary but most are in the range of at least three times the number of people killed in automobile accidents annually, some say close to 150,000.
At the Boston Children's Hospital (where my cousin's son has worked recently as a pediatric fellow), an improved method for accomplishing patient handoffs between residents was associated with a reduction in preventable harms to patients. It is a systems tactic to its core. The pediatric professors gave training sessions to the residents, standardized the information transmitted, developed a mnemonic, and changed the venue in which the handoffs were done to a quiet, private space. They call all of the above "the bundle".
Several researchers had suspected that patient hand offs were a weak link in patient care partly as a result of the restrictions on resident work hours put into effect during the last few years. The hand offs had to occur more frequently because the patients changed hands more often. The resident who knew the patients best got a rest, but the patients were left to a covering doctor whose knowledge of them was incomplete. The Boston Children's group reckoned that this was due to inadequate procedures for communicating the significant data  rapidly and effectively from one physician in training to another and could be overcome.
The Boston Children's authors state that they have demonstrated an association between what they did and the improvement in outcomes, not a causality. This, in the face of very good data, almost seems too modest a claim, but it is the right one.
One self criticism in the paper was about the July effect. The pre-intervention period was during the early part of the medical academic year when the interns (first year residents) were raw recruits. They were more seasoned when the new sign off procedures were put in place.
The reviewer for the journal raised a question about the Hawthorne effect. Many years ago an Illinois factory installed much brighter electric lighting and saw its productivity go way up only to sag as the initial enthusiasm for a new work environment waned. Workers make more effort when there is change and an awareness that they are being paid attention.  Take away the impetus of novelty and monitoring and things regress.
In spite of these caveats,  I hope that the Boston Children's study holds up not just in pediatrics, but in all of medicine.

 

11 Comments to A New Hope for Reducing Medical Errors:

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Linali on Thursday, October 16, 2014 6:24 AM
Thanks for this
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Stroke Treatment in Indore on Saturday, August 13, 2016 3:13 AM
Very good post!! Content is very impressive! Easy to read and understand! I really appreciate it!


Five Dock osteopath on Thursday, October 16, 2014 4:06 PM
I think this will be a real hope for everyone because it's a vital issue for everyone to live well. Now a days medical errors are reducing tremendously because of awareness and everyone is concentrating on this matter. So I am sure day by day it will reduce more and will come up a new future. Thanks a lot.
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Rob Vaughn MD on Saturday, November 08, 2014 11:13 AM
Phillip: My name is Rob Vaughn; I'm an anesthesiologist and spine interventionalist in Lynchburg, VA. I saw your comment following the NEJM epidural article. I'm curious about the bad outcomes you saw with epidurals. Like all responsible pain docs on the interventional side, I struggle with a procedure that has at best a 70% success rate, extensive overuse, some very small but defined rate of severe/catastrophic rate of complication, and yet a patient population that is desperate for help (even those with excellent coping skills.) Thanks for your thoughts. rv
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Dr. Alvin B. Olesh on Thursday, September 24, 2015 11:35 PM
Previously I read your article, Still Unsafe in Skeptic Magazine. This article was incredible and gave me great insight as to how I and my wife need to be proactive in the hospital or doctor's office. Then I found your blog and read every article. Your understanding of the medical system and your ability to articulate the issues that exist was a tremendous help to me. I recently had a situation in West Palm Beach, FL., I would like to mention. I was being treated by an endocrinologist in West Palm, FL. No matter how compliant I was with my diet and medications, my glucose, cholesterol and glycerines were always too high. Obviously this caused me to be taking various medications. These blood test analyses were always performed in the doctor''s office. I decided to go to a commercial lab for the same tests and the blood value levels were significantly lower. Therefore, a doctor having equipment that is not calibrated properly for whatever reason can cause a patient to be taking medications he/she should not be taking and also believing they are more ill than they are. This experience has been a major eye opener to me. Since that time, I had the gastric sleeve procedure. I shed 90 pounds and no longer am diabetic. I no longer have high blood pressure or high cholesterol.
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easyessay on Friday, December 11, 2015 8:21 AM
yes studies are really important
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one day courses on Wednesday, January 27, 2016 7:02 AM
I do think you’ve built a few genuinely exciting things. Manufactured persons would certainly actually think about this the way you only do. I will be truly satisfied there's so much details about that subject that were uncovered and also you achieved it so nicely, using so much course. Thank you.
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Meghla on Sunday, May 01, 2016 6:03 PM
Hmm...I think this will be a genuine trust in everybody since it's an imperative issue for everybody to live well. Presently a days therapeutic mistakes are diminishing immensely as a result of mindfulness and everybody is focusing on this matter. So I am certain step by step it will lessen increasingly and will come up another future. Thank you so much.
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Lily Byles on Saturday, July 01, 2017 8:33 PM
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PPC services at reasonable cost on Friday, July 21, 2017 6:31 AM
Thanks for the post.
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